Learning to live in lock down.

As the days continue long and without end before us, we need balance.

When the constraints to our freedom, even if we know we are playing our part, weigh heavy on us, we need space to restore..

When our people at work and in our families suffer to one degree or another, we must find new  ways to manage.

All in the balance

The 1984 film ‘Karate kid’, is about a young boy, Daniel, who is relentlessly bullied.

He finds unexpected support in the unlikely character Mr Miyagi.

Mr Miyagi puts him through many basic tasks for him to discover the strengths that lay within him.

In these unprecedented days we are also being put through our paces in order to find a better way to handle our bully, our enemy, Covid 19.

Part of the Mr Miyagi’s training was to enable Daniel to finally stand on one leg in the ‘crane stance’.

Mr Miyagi told him; ‘it is okay to lose to an opponent, it is not okay to lose to fear.’

The crane stance.

The crane stance required core strength and concentration that once perfected, delivered a fatal blow to the opponent.

We must make sure that we too are able to stand our ground against the fear that can invade our minds.

Far too often on the most ordinary of days we can be distracted by the many responsibilities, stresses and strains that invade our lives.

In these unprecedented times we can become side-tracked so that we lose balance as we look around for the impending threat.  This can result in us becoming hyper-vigilant and overwhelmed.

A dictionary definition of balance is an even distribution of weight enabling someone or something to remain upright and steady.

How can you remain upright and steady?

Sometimes it is about knowing the best time to take a break, the best time to take a breather.

How can you get away from the pressure when you can’t leave your house?

It is often good to look at small things that can bring change. Even if it means a few moments in the bathroom to reset.

Breathing has a massive impact on us, that is why panic attacks are so debilitating. If you can gain control of your breathing, concentrating on your breath in and out it can be really grounding. Breathe in and hold for a count of 6 and then breathe out slowly. Repeat 8 times.

Remaining balanced and keeping your focus on one point, like a ballet dancer as they spin.

If you know that time out will restore you, then maybe you will be more likely to take a break.

That break can be anything that brings relief from the present situation, reading a book, a cup of tea looking at the sky outside or through a window. Telling your team that you will be back after lunch, so that you are modelling a good work ethic.

Maybe its time to take a moment and think about restoring your own balance.

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